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The University of Ottawa (uOttawa or U of O or Ottawa U) (French: Universit? d'Ottawa) is a bilingual public research university in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The main campus is located on 42.5 hectares (105 acres) in the residential neighbourhood of Sandy Hill, adjacent to Ottawa's Rideau Canal. The university offers a wide variety of academic programs, administered by ten faculties.[4] It is a member of the U15, a group of research-intensive universities in Canada.[5] The University of Ottawa was first established as the College of Bytown in 1848 by the first bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ottawa Joseph-Bruno Guigues (French priest).[6] Placed under the direction of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, it was renamed the College of Ottawa in 1861 and received university status five years later through royal charter.[7] On 5 February 1889, the university was granted a pontifical charter by Pope Leo XIII, elevating the institution to a pontifical university.[8] The University was reorganized on 1 July 1965 as a corporation, independent from any outside body or religious organization. As a result, the civil and pontifical charters were kept by the newly created Saint Paul University, federated with the university. The remaining civil faculties were retained by the reorganized university.[7] The university is co-educational and enrolls over 40,000 students, nearly 35,000 undergraduate and over 6,000 post-graduate students. The university has more than 185,000 alumni. The university's athletic teams are known as the Gee-Gees and are members of Canadian Interuniversity Sport. Contents [hide] 1 History 2 Facilities 2.1 Libraries and museum 2.2 Housing and student facilities 2.3 Off campus facilities 2.4 Sustainability 3 Administration 3.1 Finances 4 Academics 4.1 Bilingualism 4.2 Reputation 4.3 Research 4.4 Co-operative Education 4.5 Admission 5 Student life 5.1 Athletics 6 Notable people and alumni 7 See also 8 Notes 9 External links History[edit] Arts Building 1904 Tabaret Hall in the foreground, with Desmarais building in the background, at the University of Ottawa Tabaret Hall was named after Joseph-Henri Tabaret and houses the university's central administrative offices The university was established on 26 September 1848 as the College of Bytown by the first Roman Catholic bishop of Ottawa, Joseph-Bruno Guigues. He entrusted administration to the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate.[9] The college was originally located in Lower Town, housed in a wooden building next to the Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica. However, space quickly became an issue for administrators, triggering two moves in 1852 and a final move to Sandy Hill in 1856.[10] The Sandy Hill property was donated by Louis-Theodore Besserer, where he offered a substantial parcel from his estate for the college.[6] The college was renamed College of Ottawa in 1861, following the city's name change from Bytown to Ottawa. In 1866, the college received its first charter, as well as university status, making it the final institution in Canada to receive a Royal Charter from London before the British North America Act, 1867 made education a provincial responsibility.[7][11] By 1872 the university had already begun to confer undergraduate degrees, with master's degrees coming in 1875 and doctoral degrees in 1888.[7] On 5 February 1889, the university was granted a pontifical charter from Pope Leo XIII, elevating the university to a pontifical university.[8] The university faced a crisis when fire destroyed the main building on 2 December 1903. After the fire, the university hired New York architect A. O. Von Herbulis to design its replacement, Tabaret Hall. It was among the first Canadian structures to be completely fireproof, built of reinforced concrete.[12] Women first enrolled in 1919.[13] A few weeks after the start of the Second World War, a Canadian Officer Training Corp was established at the university, with training beginning on in January 1940. An air force training corp was created in 1942 and a naval training corp in 1943. Participation in one of the three corps became mandatory for all students over 18, although they were not obliged to participate in the actual war.[14] During this time, the Royal Canadian Air Force used parts of the university's grounds for training and the university constructed barracks to house members of the Canadian Women's Army Corps. In total 1,158 students and alumni of the university enrolled the Canadian Forces during the war, losing 50 killed in action.[14] The Ottawa architecture firm of Burgess, McLean & MacPhadyen designed the Eastern Ontario Institute of Technology (later to merge with the Ontario Vocational Centre and renamed Algonquin College), opened its new Rideau Campus on a 12 acre city owned Lees Avenue site in 1964. After being unused for a number of years, the midcentury academic complex was sold to the University of Ottawa in January 2007.[15] The university was reorganized on 1 July 1965 as a corporation independent from any outside body or religious organization, becoming publicly funded. As a result, the civil and pontifical charters were transferred to the newly created Saint Paul University, federated with the corporation, while the remaining civil faculties were retained by the reorganized university.[7] In 1974, a new policy mandated by the Government of Ontario strengthened institutional bilingualism at the university, with specific instructions to further bilingualism and biculturalism and preserve and develop French culture.[16] In 1989, Dr. Wilbert Keon of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute performed the country's first neonatal artificial heart transplant on an 11-day-old baby.[17] On 11 November 1998, during the University of Ottawa's 150th anniversary celebrations, two war memorial plaques were unveiled in the foyer of Tabaret Hall which honour 1000 graduates of the university community who took part in armed conflict, especially the list of 50 graduates who lost their lives.[18] The engineering building, Col By Hall, was unveiled in September 2005 as a memorial dedicated to Lieutenant-Colonel John By, Royal Engineers.[19] Facilities[edit] The university's main campus lies within the neighbourhood of Sandy Hill. The main campus is bordered to the north by the ByWard Market district, to the east by Sandy Hill's residential area and to the southwest and west by Nicholas Street, which runs adjacent to the Rideau Canal on the western half of the University. As of the 2010-2011 academic year, the main campus occupied 35.3 ha (87 acres), though the University owns and manages other properties throughout the city, raising the university's total extent to 42.5 ha (105 acres).[20] The main campus moved two times before settling in its final location in 1856. When the institution was first founded, the campus was located next to the Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica. With space a major issue in 1852, the campus moved to a location presently across from the National Gallery of Canada. In 1856, the institution moved to its present location.[10] The buildings at the university vary in age, from 100 Laurier (1893) to 120 University (Faculty of Social Sciences, 2012).[21] In 2011 the average age of buildings was 63.[20] In the 2011-2012 academic year, the university owned and managed 30 main buildings, 806 research laboratories, 301 teaching laboratories and 257 classrooms and seminar rooms.[1][20] The main campus is presently divided between its older Sandy Hill campus and its Lees campus, purchased in 2007. While Lees Campus is not adjacent to Sandy Hill, it is displayed as part of the main campus on school maps.[22] Lees campus, within walking distance of Sandy Hill, was originally a satellite campus owned by Algonquin College.[23] Libraries and museum[edit] The University of Ottawa Libraries include six campus libraries that house more than 4.5 million titles in monograph and electronic form as of 2013.[24] The main library is in Morisset Hall, houses the Media Resources, the Archives and Special Collections and the Geographic, Statistical and Government Information. The university has five other specialized libraries: Brian Dickson Law Library, located in Fauteux Hall; the Health Sciences Library, located at the Roger Guindon campus; the Management Library, located in the Desmarais building; the Music Library, located in Perez Hall; and the Annex, an off-site storage facility to house less-used portions of the collection.[25] Morisett Hall at the University of Ottawa Morisett Library is the main library for the University and houses the majority of its special collections. The University of Ottawa Museum of Classical Antiquities was established in 1975 as a teaching collection, operated by the Department of Classical and Religious Studies. Composed of artifacts which reflect daily life during the period from the 7th century BC to the 7th century AD, the permanent collection is enhanced by touring exhibitions.[26] Housing and student facilities[edit] Although most students live off-campus, the university has seven student residences: Brooks, Le Blanc Hall, Marchand Hall, Stanton, Thompson Hall, Hyman Soloway, and 90 University.[27] The university offers a variety of housing options. Four of the seven residences are conventional single and double bedrooms. Brooks and Hyman Soloway are 2?4 bedroom apartment-styled residences, while 90 University is a two bedroom suite-styled residence.[28] In September 2010, 26.2 percent of first-year students lived on campus, part of the 8.8 percent of the overall undergraduate population which lived on campus.[29] Residents are represented by the Residents' Association of the University of Ottawa (RAUO). With a mandate to help improve the quality of life in residences, each building elects a representative to the association. The RAUO also provides a political representation on the behalf of the residents. Buildings may collect a small fee, known as the floor fund to pay for the group.[30] The Jock Turcot University Centre (UCU) is the centre of student life and programming. Located between Montpetit Hall and Morisett Library, the centre was completed in 1973 at a cost of over C$6 million.[31] Funding for the centre was partially offset by the Jock Turcot University Fund, which was set up by the student body. The centre was named after former student federation president Jock Turcot, who was killed in a traffic collision in 1965.[31] The university has over thirty five dining outlets. This includes several major restaurant chains.[32] Off campus facilities[edit] Off-campus faculties are located throughout Ottawa. The university owns and operates another campus located in Ottawa's Riverview neighbourhood, known as the Health Science or Alta Vista campus. Located on Smyth Road, the Health Science campus is 7.2 ha (18 acres).[20] The campus primarily serves the Faculty of Medicine as well as hosting programs for the Faculty of Health Sciences. Roger Guindon Hall serves as the primary building for students at the campus.[33] The Health Science campus is located in between The Ottawa Hospital and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, both of which are university-affiliated.[34] Many of the hospital's health professionals and researchers teach in the Faculties of Medicine and Health Sciences. Medical and health sciences students learn on the job at The Ottawa Hospital.[35] The university operates the Centre for Executive Leadership at the World Exchange Plaza. Located on O'Connor Street in Downtown Ottawa, the centre is primarily used by the Telfer School of Management's Executive Master of Business Administration program.[36] The centre includes one amphitheatre-style classroom, seven case rooms for team meetings, collaborative work and/or independent study and conference and boardroom spaces.[36] Sustainability[edit] The Office of Campus Sustainability, established in 2006, coordinates, promotes and implements sustainable development activities.[37][38] The Office of Campus Sustainability is headed by the Sustainable Development Committee. Membership of the committee comprises administrators, students, community groups and the City of Ottawa.[39] Along with the other members of the Council of Ontario Universities, the University of Ottawa signed a pledge in November 2009 known as Ontario Universities Committed to a Greener World, with the objective of transforming its campus into a model of environmental responsibility.[40] The university is a signatory of the Talloires Declaration.[41] Several programs from the university placed in the 2011 Corporate Knights rankings, which measures how well Canadian universities integrate sustainability into their curriculum. Telfer School of Management ranked fifth in Canada for undergraduate business programs. The Corporate Knights also ranked Telfer eighth in Canada for MBA program. The University of Ottawa has implemented a variety of activities in order to increase sustainability across campus. The university has been working on creating a more sustainable campus through the efforts of the Office of Campus Sustainability. One of the main programs occurring at the University of Ottawa to promote waste reduction is RecycleMania. RecycleMania is a competition among colleges and universities that occurs within a 10-week period of time.[42] Each school is to report their trash and recycling data which are then ranked according to the largest quantity of recyclables.[42] The purpose of this competition is to see who has the highest recycling rate. As results fluctuate among competitors, schools get more enticed to keep reducing waste.[42] In 2011, the University of Ottawa was awarded first place among Canadian universities in the RecycleMania competition.[42] The university also ranked 14th out of 180 universities in the ?waste minimization? category in the international RecycleMania competition. The RecyleMania program will continue to encourage and inform University of Ottawa students on how to change their consumption habits as well as recycle.[42] One of the newer programs initiated by the University of Ottawa is the Free Store.[43] The Free Store is a location in which students can drop off items they no longer want and pick up items they do want for free.[43] The reason this was created was to reduce consumption by offering free items to students who no longer want items that may be used by someone else.[43] Items that are dropped off include clothing, textbooks, electronics, and office supplies. The Free Store is located at 647 King Edward.[43] On 1 September 2010, the University of Ottawa stopped selling bottled water on campus and created a bottled water ban in order to reduce plastic consumption, and encourage students to carry reusable water bottles and use campus water fountains. [44] The University of Ottawa put forth $150 000 to improve the water fountains across campus.[44] SITE building at the University of Ottawa SITE Building, home of the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The new Social Sciences Building at the University of Ottawa is the university?s latest green initiative. The fifteen-storey building that took about four years of planning and construction to complete opened its doors in September 2012.[44] The Social Sciences Building that cost a grand total of $112.5 million provides students and faculty with an array of space for individual studying and group work.[44] This building is the newest addition to the University of Ottawa with its green and sustainable architecture and facilities.[44] This building is very different among the rest of the university?s buildings as its structure and characteristics are very eco-friendly. Some features that the building includes are: construction materials that were chosen due to their recycled content, a living wall that is five stories tall and composed of numerous plants that with act as an air filtration system, and a green roof.[44] The green wall is the tallest living biofilter wall in North America. The wall is situated in the main agora of the Faculty of Social Science building and is visible from the outside. The green wall is a unique component of the building?s air handling system, for it is capable of treating a large quantity of air at a time, and it provides a source of humidity that doesn?t need to be artificially introduced.[45] The living wall was built on 14 October 2012, by Diamond & Shmitt Architects.[46] Eighty percent of the building?s heating will be recycled and created through the building?s data centres (computer labs, etc.). [44] This heating system will also heat nearby buildings including Vanier Hall. Not only has the University of Ottawa stayed true to their reputation of being on the forefront of sustainable living by creating the green wall, but they have also created a green roof, which is potentially the first green roof constructed on a Canadian university campus.[47] The green roof was established in 1971 on the rooftop of the Colonel By building.[48] One of the faculty?s goals is to achieve an LEED Gold Certification, which is given to green buildings that meet specific environmental guidelines.[44] In 2006, the University of Ottawa established the first community campus garden. Over the course of the past eight years, the community garden has expanded in terms of the number of plants that occupy it, and has grown into a full-fledged garden containing more than thirty pots in various locations on campus. The community garden is open from early spring until mid-autumn.[49] In addition to the various eco-friendly accomplishments that have been added to the university over the years, in 2005, the university established a boreal forest and wetland environment, and is in the middle of creating a living classroom for students to enjoy.[50] The University of Ottawa is on the rise to being one of the top eco-friendly Canadian universities in North America.[51] The University of Ottawa has also introduced a bike share program to encourage cycling to and from school. The university offers free bicycle rentals and access to free maintenance and repair workshops.[44] Along with new bike routes and services, the university has enhanced car-pooling and shuttle services, and is also conveniently located next to the transit way to encourage students to use public transit via a discounted university student buss pass.[44] The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) provides various activities that attempt to increase sustainability practices among individuals and institutions, promote resource sharing, and make sustainable practices a norm within higher education institutions.[52] The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS), created by AASHE, was designed to provide guidelines for better understanding of sustainability and build a more sustainable community throughout university campuses.[53] It is a way for universities and colleges to measure their sustainability efforts. The program compares higher education facilities? sustainability initiatives and ranks them based on their efforts. In 2011, the University of Ottawa received a silver star by the STARS program.[54] The Office of Campus Sustainability continues to create various events and programs to promote sustainability among students at the University of Ottawa. They are responsible for informing students of all initiatives and programs put forth by the University. Eco-friendly initiatives are growing rapidly at the University of Ottawa with the help of the office. Administration[edit] Tabaret Hall building at the University of Ottawa Tabaret Hall in 1903 Governance is conducted through the Board of Governors and the Senate, whose roles were established by the University of Ottawa Act, 1965. The Act describes their membership and powers, as well as their principal officers.[55] The Board provides overall governance and management, including financial decisions and the implementation of policies and procedures.[56] The Board consists of an executive committee which includes the Chair of the Board and the Vice-Chair and Chair of the Executive Committee. As stipulated by the act, the board comprises no more than 32 members, appointed or elected by the various parts of the university community. While not stipulated in the act, the board's membership includes elected undergraduate and graduate student representatives.[57][58] The Board includes one honorary member, the current chancellor.[57] The Senate sets educational policies and the management of academic issues. Such powers include the ability to create and abolish faculties, departments, schools and institutes, academic regulations, admission standards, degree and diploma requirements. It confers certificates, degrees at all levels and with the approval of the board, honorary doctorates.[59] The Senate consists of 72 members including president, who acts as its chair. Other members of the Senate, as mentioned in the act, include the chancellor, the president, vice-presidents and the dean of each faculty, including those of federated universities. While not outlined in the act, the Senate includes students from each faculty.[58][60] As stipulated in the act, the chancellor is the university's titular head and is accorded a place of honour at commencement exercises and other functions and may preside at examinations. The chancellor is appointed by the board with the concurrence of the Senate and holds the office for one or more four-year terms.[58] As of 2012, the chancellor was Micha?lle Jean, appointed on 1 February 2012.[61] The president is the chief executive officer and chairman of the Senate with the responsibility of managing the direction of academic work and general administration, teaching staff, officers, servants and students. The president is appointed by the board and continues until the board votes otherwise.[58] The office was first referred to as superior until the university received a pontifical charter, when the name changed to rector in 1889. In 2004, the English title of rector was replaced with president.[62] Finances[edit] Net assets as of 30 April 2011 stood at $904.071 million.[63] The University completed the 2010?2011 year with revenues of $861.576 million, expenses of $810.051 million and an excess of revenues over expenses of $41.466 million.[63] The largest single source of revenue originates from operating grants, valued at $369.801 million for the 2011-2012 academic year. The second-largest source of revenue that year was tuition fees, which reached $264.792 million.[64] As of 30 April 2011, its endowment was valued at $164.51 million.[63] The university was registered as an educational charitable organization in Canada on 1 January 1967. As of 2011, the University was registered primarily as a post-secondary institution.[65] The university's Institutional Research and Planning department estimated that its students, staff, visitors and the institution itself brought in an estimated total of $4.12 billion into the local economy in 2011.[66]
Founded in 1878, we deliver ‘The Western Experience’, an exemplary learning experience that engages the best and brightest people challenging them to meet ever-higher standards in the classroom and beyond.We inform every dimension of a student – intellectual, social, cultural as well as physical. From our home in London, Ont., Canada, outward across every continent, Western prepares future leaders to succeed.
The National University of Entre Rios was created by Law No. 20,366, May 1973 and consisted of agglutination under one rectory, a number of existing academic units that relied on various jurisdictions (Universidad del Litoral, Universidad Catolica Argentina) others that were created in conjunction with the University.It was one of the sixteen universities created between May 1971 and May 1973 by the then military government of General Lanusse, who assumed the ideas of Taquini Plan.
In 1974, through the Law 20,753, the National University of Central Buenos Aires is created and thus came to fruition the efforts made in order to gather in a national university existing university structures in the cities of Tandil Olavarria and Blue.In the early 60s when he had begun in our country the process of establishment of private universities, is growing in Tandil the idea of ​​setting up an institute of higher education in the growing student population could get a college education without having that cross the boundaries of their region. On May 30, 1964, the intensive efforts made by enthusiastic teachers, professionals, students and neighbors, including the name of Dr. Osvaldo Zarini stands, culminating with the founding of the University Institute of Tandil.
This is a remarkable achievement for Singapore, and a timely birthday gift for this young nation celebrating her 50th year of independence this year – to have two universities ranked in the world's top 15. The top two Asian universities in the world rankings are now both from Singapore. Young Singaporeans can be very proud that they have two universities of international repute to choose from to get top-quality education right at home," said NTU President, Professor Bertil Andersson.
The National University of Rosario is a research public university located in the city of Rosario, province of Santa Fe, Argentina.
The National University of La Rioja is an Argentine national university, situated in the city of La Rioja, capital of La Rioja Province.
The origin of the National University of Córdoba dates back to the first quarter of the seventeenth century, when the Jesuits opened the Maximum School, where students -particularly, religious order- received that philosophy and theology classes. This high intellectual category was the basis of the future University.
.Founded in August 1905 by Dr. Joaquín V. González, the UNLP emerged as a modern university, away from the characteristic mark of traditional academic institutions of higher education The History of the National University of La Plata begins to take shape in the late nineteenth century, when then-Senator Buenos Aires Rafael Hernandez He promoted the initiative to create a university that would answer the needs renewed scientific, technical and cultural training demonstrating the younger generations who began to inhabit the newly founded city of La Plata, the new capital of the province of Buenos Aires.
The building of the Rectory, which was completed in 1935, has transcended the events that took place in it. Among them it should be noted that the hall of the auditorium hosted twice the Constituent National Convention in 1957 and in 1994.
The foundation of the National University of Cuyo was completed on March 21 in 1939. Since its inception directed its activity towards the clarification of the great human problems, with particular reference to national and regional life.
The School of Medicine was created in Corrientes, on March 5, 1953 by Resolution No. 79 of the Rector of the Universidad Nacional del Litoral, ad referendum of the University Council, which upheld by Resolution No. 234 of March 24 the same year, as under the Faculty of Medical Sciences,Pharmacy and the University Children Ramos said.

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